When traveling in Europe, Paris and London specifically, I was struck by these very large, very cool underground looking posters for Levi's. The words were ambiguous, yet intriguing. The photography: stark and raw. I liked them. Upon returning to the states, I realized that these same ads were here, all over new york city, and becoming more and more frequent every day. The posters, magazine ads, billboards, and websites are all part of the Go Forth Campaign for Levi's jeans. Now this is cool.

Levi's approached Wieden + Kennedy for these ads, with a goal of, according to executive creative director Susan Hoffman, wanting to pay homage to Levi's history, "but also to refresh and reinvent the idea of a pioneering spirit for the times in which we live". Pretty awesome. The ads also feature copy by none other than the ultimate American pioneer, Walt Witman... post-mortem credits baby!

From a design point of view, I love them. I think they're original, and full of energy. The white type over photography is simply beautiful. The words are few and chosen perfectly. This is what I try to do with my type and print work too, pick out words that are poetry to me and pick them out as art pieces themselves. Levi's has illuminated this concept for the masses.

Also, I think these ads are a PERFECT thing to have around. This last year has been tough for America, and there's also the problem that Americans don't get out enough. These ads prompt the exploration of America, and the spirit of what got us here in the first place: pioneersmanship. What an up lift!

Finally, This Go Forth Campaign has some other incredibly interesting history, apparently giving the campaign its name. True or not, it's an incredibly thrilling concept, and something to be excited about. This is the story according to Levi's:

Pretty cool. I'll be following the history over the next several weeks about Grayson Ozias IV. The official contest started yesterday. Check it out. If you're not into that kind of thing, then at least keep an eye out for the ads. They're beautiful. And really make me want to go read more Walt Witman.

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